Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Research in Education (Extended Campus - Catherine Leahy-Brine)

This guide is for students enrolled at Fitchburg State through the Catherine Leahy-Brine extended campus program.

To Cite or Not To Cite...

Even if your professor doesn't tell you to cite your sources, you still have too. Chances are, if they didn't tell you, they just assumed you know it's required. Any source you get information from whether it is an interview with a person, a pamphlet from a government office, a web page, a journal article, a book, etc. requires a citation. When you use that sources' information, you must give them credit; if you don't you, you are plagiarizing.

  Paraphrasing vs. Quoting

Paraphrasing is different from quoting, but it's not always as easy to do.  Here are some resources to help you learn how to paraphrase better.

  Plagiarism

"plagiarize"

  • to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own
  • to use (another's production) without crediting the source
  • to commit literary theft
  • to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source

(From Merriam Webster Online.)

Explore the links below to learn more about Plagiarism and how to avoid it.