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Citations: MLA Style

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APA Downloadable Quick Guides

Citing in MLA Style

MLA (or, Modern Language Association) citation style is used primarily in the humanities, such as English, philosophy, music, and religion, but it can also be used for other subjects.

This one-page guide focuses on citing sources in a Works Cited page, or bibliography. MLA style also dictates how sources are cited in-text (in the body of a paper). The examples in this handout are from the Diana Hacker online guide, and cover the most commonly cited types of sources – books, articles, and websites. For help with in-text citation and citing other types of sources, visit the Hacker website, refer to the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (available on reserve at the library), or ask a librarian.

BOOKS

With an author:

With an editor or editors:

Begin with the editor’s name. For one editor, use “ed.” (for “editor”) after the name; for multiple editors, use “eds.” (for “editors”).

Lago, Mary, Linda K. Hughes, and Elizabeth MacLeod Walls, eds. The BBC Talks of E. M. Forster, 1929-1960. Columbia: U of Missouri P, 2008. Print.

ARTICLE FROM AN ONLINE DATABASE (e.g. Academic Search Premier)

ARTICLE FROM A PRINT JOURNAL

ARTICLE FROM A PRINT NEWSPAPER

WEBSITE, OR DOCUMENT FROM A WEBSITE

Websites often do not have the same information as other sources – some have authors for specific articles or pages, others may not. Some have dates on pages or entries, others may only have a copyright date for the whole site. If you’re not sure how to cite a website, ask a librarian for help.

With an author:

With no author: